Tag Archives: twomorrows

6 Collected Editions Worthy Of Your Attention #30

Is there one book that is a “must have” that came out this week? My friends Andy Tom (@AndrewJTom), Chris Campbell (@ChrisCampbell8), Marc Diefenderfer (@Dief88), Shane Hannafey, Adam Besenyodi (@adambesenyodi), Joey Nazzari (@CaptDS9E), Wallace Ryan (@ReverendLove) and I (@ChrisCCL) are sharing some comic book collected editions, reprints and/or graphic novels released this week that you may be interested in.

Thor By Walter Simonson Vol. 1 TP (Marvel)
Thor By Walter Simonson Vol. 1 TP (Marvel)

Picked by @AndrewJTom
Thor By Walter Simonson Vol. 1 TP (Marvel)
Collects Thor #337-345, $24.99
I’m not gonna ramble on about the myriad reasons to buy this book (yeah right). Just know this… Walt Simonson’s Thor is the Thor run that all other runs on the character aspire to be. The Simonson Thor run is so defining that Uncle Walt appeared in the Thor movie sitting at the head table dining with Thor (while Stan played a hillbilly with a pickup truck). Yes, there are other good Thor runs out there (Stan & Jack, Straczynski, and most recently Jason Aaron), but none of them did as much for the character as Walt Simonson. This book is a “must have” for any Marvel fan (or comics fan in general). It’s one of the top runs of all time and should be in everyone’s collection. If you haven’t picked up the “Frost Giant sized” Omnibus, this is a great alternative. It has the “new” coloring by Steve Oliffe that was so prominently featured in the Omnibus, but at much more manageable size and cost. It’s a must have for any Thor fan or anyone new to the character coming out of the films.

Super Graphic: A Visual Guide to the Comic Book Universe (Chronicle Books)
Super Graphic: A Visual Guide to the Comic Book Universe (Chronicle Books)

Picked by Shane
Super Graphic: A Visual Guide to the Comic Book Universe (Chronicle Books), $18.95
I have been visiting family in the New York area for the past week and happened upon this book in a small store in Greenwich Village. I don’t think it is widely known to comics fans, but really should be. Edited by Tim Leong, the Director of Digital Design at Wired magazine, it is both an enjoyable book and a partial encyclopedia of comics history. The book is comprised of charts and graphs and whereas that might sound boring, these graphic representations are not only educational for comics fans, but incredibly entertaining too. For example, there is a chart showing the average utility bill for the Gotham City Police Department. Can you guess what uses the most power? I’ll give you a hint… it shoots a big bat signal into the sky. Or maybe the periodic table of the Metal Men. While these two were made purely for fun and many more are like that, there are ones that give you incredible historical information. The Watchmen primer not only shows the character relationships but a timeline of their universe. There is a graph showing Stan Lee’s history in comic books. And this book isn’t just limited to DC and Marvel comics. There are references to Scott Pilgrim, Cerebus, Walking Dead, Tintin and Mad magazine among others. There are also charts and graphs that reference cosplay, comic con, manga and other aspects of fandom. There is far too much to write about and it is very hard to give a real review of this book, but trust me, if you’re a comics fan, pick it up. It is a welcome surprise and something entirely different from most people are used to reading. You’ll love it!

In The Days Of The Mob By Jack Kirby HC (DC Comics)
In The Days Of The Mob By Jack Kirby HC (DC Comics)

Picked by @ReverendLove
In The Days Of The Mob By Jack Kirby HC (DC Comics)
Collects In The Days Of The Mob #1 and stories from Amazing World Of DC Comics #1 and 10, 108 pages, $39.99
If there is one book that I’ve been waiting for all summer, it has to be the hardcover collection of Jack Kirby’s classic comic book magazine “In the Days of the Mob”. When Jack left Marvel in 1970 for DC Comics, he brought with him a boatload of concepts and characters that would change the DC universe forever. Besides the legendary Fourth World series, Kirby had wanted to do a series of full colour comic magazines called the “Speak-Out Series”. In the end, only two of his planned magazines saw publication as “Spirit World”#1 and my own personal favourite, “In the Days of the Mob”#1, albeit in black and white.
I’d seen both mags advertised in several DC Comics when I was young but it wasn’t until I attended a convention in 1998 that I finally found and purchased my own copies. I held on to them until a few years ago when I parted them with the full expectation that DC, after all the other recent Kirby books they’d published, would probably be reprinting the classic series. DC came through with the 2012 release of “Spirit World” and today, released the hardcover collection, “In the Days of the Mob”.
This volume, like “Spirit World” contains both issues of “In the Days of the Mob” including the unpublished second issue. I reread the classic “Ma’s Boys” and “Bullets for Big Al” along with the other shorter stories from the first issue and then prepared for the joy that is reading a Kirby comic for the first time. And I wasn’t disappointed. I loved the two main stories “Murder Inc.” and “The Ride” both of which bristled with action, brutality and a fast paced violence that one associates with a good old-fashioned Mob story. The two shorter stories “Ladies of the Gang” and “A Room for Kid Twist” nicely round-up this bold and bloody look into the life of the Mob during the Dirty 30′s. The art and storytelling are vintage 70′s Kirby with assistance from inkers Vince Colletta and Mike Royer who despite their different approaches are both successful in their delineation of the King’s work.
This is one book, I must insist that, in the words of the King, you “Don’t Ask!!! Just Buy it!”!!!!

Todd, The Ugliest Kid On Earth, Vol. 1 TP (Image)
Todd, The Ugliest Kid On Earth, Vol. 1 TP (Image)

Picked by @CaptDS9E
Todd, The Ugliest Kid On Earth, Vol. 1 TP (Image)
Collects Todd, The Ugliest Kid On Earth #1-4, $9.99
I went into Todd the Ugliest Kid on Earth with a little trepidation. I am not usually a fan of dark comedies, and for a little over an issue I thought I made a mistake trying this. However something just clicked in issue two, and It had me. I couldn’t stop reading. Todd is a young boy (with a brown paper bag on his head) whose parents are crazy. They treat him like crap, but he is a good kid, and the perfect picture of innocence. This innocence is what makes this book worth the while. A new girl moves next door, and Todd decides to try to make a friend. He talks to her, but he is set up by a local Bully, that not only gets him in trouble, but makes him look like a fool. Overnight the new girl disappears, and in a strange piece of events Todd is fingered for her murder by cop who is a few fries short of a Happy Meal. The poor kid is put in an adult Jail for her murder, and other killings that have happened recently. This is when the book shines, We follow Todd in every single possible bad situation you could think of to happen in a prison. Except because Todd is so naive to what is going on, it makes for a lot of laughs. Some of the pages in this section are priceless. We also follow along the crazy stuff happening outside the prison with both of Todd’s parents, the nut cop who arrested him, and the real person behind the murders. This all happens in four issues of hilarity. I am very happy to see they decided series will continue, as it ends on a cliffhanger, which I can’t wait to see Todd deal with next. Highly Recommend if you want a laugh.

Fagin The Jew 10th Anniversary HC (Dark Horse)
Fagin The Jew 10th Anniversary HC (Dark Horse)

Picked by @ChrisCCL
Fagin The Jew 10th Anniversary HC (Dark Horse), $19.99
The great Will Eisner died just over eight years ago, which means the “10th Anniversary” Edition of Fagin: The Jew was one of the last comics Eisner ever did. Volumes have been written about Eisner and I can’t do him any more justice here in a few sentences. But what I can tell you is that Eisner was as strong as ever right up until the end. This particular book is a take on the classic Charles Dickens novel, Oliver Twist and is from the  point-of-view of Fagin, the pick-pocket, who serves as a mentor to street children including the Oliver’s friend the Artful Dodger. Many of us know the story, either from the 1970′s movie or a high school musical, but to get a new perspective is always refreshing. This new hardcover edition sports Eisner’s previously unused full-color cover art.

and…

Comic Book Creator 2 - Joe Kubert (TwoMorrow Publishing)
Comic Book Creator 2 – Joe Kubert (TwoMorrow Publishing)

Comic Book Creator 2 – Joe Kubert (TwoMorrow Publishing), $17.95
I can’t believe my good buddy, @AndrewJTom didn’t want to cover this one this week, he’s the biggest Kubert fan I know. This new Comic Book Creator quarterly series from TwoMorrows is a hybrid of small book and long magazine. Commissioned in early 2012, Kubert passed away in August during the writing of the mag. That is reflected here as editor Jon B. Cooke and others quickly converted several articles as a prologue to Kuberts’ long storied comic book life. Including very personal insights from Joe’s sons Adam and Andy. I’m sure longer and more comprehensive biographies are in the works, but for now this is an excellent primer to one of the greats of the industry. I suggest picking up The Joe Kubert Archives from Fantagraphics, too.

Now it’s your turn. What books that came out this week do you recommend? Take a look at the sidebar to see this weeks collected edition releases.

6 Collected Editions Worthy Of Your Attention #28

Is there one book that is a “must have” that came out this week? My friends Andy Tom (@AndrewJTom), Chris Campbell (@ChrisCampbell8), Marc Diefenderfer (@Dief88), Shane Hannafey, Adam Besenyodi (@adambesenyodi), Joey Nazzari (@CaptDS9E), Wallace Ryan (@ReverendLove) and I (@ChrisCCL) are sharing some comic book collected editions, reprints and/or graphic novels released this week that you may be interested in.

Creepy Presents Steve Ditko HC (Dark Horse)
Creepy Presents Steve Ditko HC (Dark Horse)

Picked by @AndrewJTom
Creepy Presents Steve Ditko HC (Dark Horse), $19.99
Look, I’m not gonna’ go all “comics historian” on you; but even the most cynical comics fan needs to have a soft spot in their heart for Steve Ditko. I’ve never really been that much of a Ditko fan, much less Ditko purist (like the boss, Chris Marshall), but I respected the man and the contributions that he’s made to the medium over the years. Of course I knew that he was the creator of Spider-Man, but over time I went on to discover his other contributions that weren’t necessarily ripe for Saturday morning cartoons. Books like the Question, Dr. Strange, The Creeper, and Mr. A would eventually reinforce the greatness of Ditko’s legacy to me as I grew older and learned to appreciate him more and more. When the new solicits for this weeks collected editions came out I noticed that there was a new “Creepy Presents” HC coming… and it was a Steve Ditko collection. First of all, I had NO idea that Ditko ever did work for Creepy or Eerie. Obviously, I needed to talk to my good friend Zack (a Ditko historian) to get the low down on this book. I discovered that Ditko crafted sixteen stories with collaborator, Archie Goodwin (fifteen of which are printed in this volume). After my conversation with Zack I came to the realization that this format (produced by those classic magazines) was the perfect book to spotlight the genius of Steve Ditko. It’s a place that can let Ditko’s brilliance run wild, while dazzling us with dark, mind bending images that would’ve never seen print in a Marvel or DC book. It’s a place that allows he and Archie to craft their stories at a finite pace, without the confines of editorial control. Aside from the joy that is Steve Ditko, the “Creepy/Eerie Presents…” series being published by Dark Horse are currently one of the best values in the collected edition market. These are high quality books that retail for around $20 (except the Corben book at $30). The books are hardbound, oversized, and printed on quality paper. They’re a great alternative to the Creepy/Eerie Archives which can be a little bit cost prohibitive, but also are a great introduction to the stories of these classic magazines. One word of warning to you though, they’re highly addictive. If you haven’t started your collection of Creepy/Eerie books, this is the perfect one to start with.

Star Wars: Agent Of The Empire Volume 2 - Hard Targets TP (Dark Horse)
Star Wars: Agent Of The Empire Volume 2 – Hard Targets TP (Dark Horse)

Picked by @CaptDS9E
Star Wars: Agent Of The Empire Volume 2 – Hard Targets TP (Dark Horse)
Collects Star Wars: Agent Of The Empire Hard Targets, $19.99
Dark Horse has put out a lot of good SW books over the years, but the last few have seen many great ones. One of those is Agent of the Empire. The first miniseries introduced us to Johan Cross who is an Imperial Intelligence officer, who does whatever he needs to do, to get things done for the Empire. In other words he is a mix of characters like James Bond, Jason Bourne, Ethan Hunt, etc., however is not a good guy. In this second miniseries he returns to his home world of Alderaan for a celebration of the current Count Dooku (yes there seems to be many over the years). However an assassin kills the count, which sends Johan on chase where he does not know who he can trust, as he tries to protect the dead Count’s young son. Are people he trusted really his allies, and are enemies really the people who he should fear? It’s a fun ride, which also has cameos by some major players in the SW universe. Really fun read for any Star Wars fan, and another great character created by writer John Ostrander.

Camelot 3000 TPB (DC Comics)
Camelot 3000 TPB (DC Comics)

Picked by @ReverendLove
Camelot 3000 TPB (DC Comics)
Collects Camelot 3000 #’s 1-12, $19.99
Gather round ye Knights of Ole and share in the adventures of a reborn King Arthur and his court in a far-flung future brought to us by Mike Barr and the incredible Brian Bolland. It was published in 1982 for the direct market only and was DC’s first maxi-series, replete with glossy paper and a story to match. “Camelot 3000” tells the tale of King Arthur and six of his knights of the Round Table who are reincarnated into modern bodies and assume their old identities…except for Arthur and Merlin, who have somehow slept the centuries away.
As in the original legend though, disaster has already been sown for this new Camelot by the seeds of the old romantic triangle that trapped and destroyed the friendship and love between Arthur, Guinevere and the home-wrecker, Sir Lancelot. My favourite of the reborn Knights is the tormented Sir Tristan, who, unlike the others, was reborn into the body of a woman and struggles with his/her loyalty to Arthur when tempted by the villain, Morgaine le Fey to betray the Court in exchange for her old body. The writing is quick paced, imaginative and keeps you on the edge of your seat as King Arthur and his merry gang fight for the freedom of earth. Bolland’s work, is, of course, simply beautiful and serves the storytelling side of the series admirably. I’ve always loved Bolland’s covers and it seemed that after this series, aside from the classic “The Killing Joke”, that he has been relegated to been the King of Covers for DC Comics. Sometimes though, I wish he’d put them aside and give us some of that old-time Bolland magic!
I was always a sucker for legends and myths when I was a kid and as an adult I got to engage that passion once again with Barr and Bolland’s “Camelot 3000”.

Guild The Official Companion SC (Titan Publishing)
Guild The Official Companion SC (Titan Publishing)

Picked by Shane
Guild The Official Companion SC (Titan Publishing), $19.95
I’m a sucker for these companion books. On top of that, Titan has published some beautiful books. I’ve bought every one they’ve made about Firefly/Serenity. The Guild is a very fun web series. With the number of TV shows, movies and of course, COMICS that take up my limited free time, I usually don’t even bother watching anything on the web except the occasional short YouTube clip. I don’t remember what got me interested in The Guild, but it was getting a lot of publicity and I liked its creator Felicia Day. She was a Joss Whedon regular who starred in the TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and another great product of the World Wide Web, Dr. Horrible’s Sing- Along Blog. It wasn’t even about something I was into… online gaming. I didn’t have a PS3 (I do now) or Xbox, nor did I play anything on my PC. But this series hooked me right in. So far there have been six seasons and it just keeps getting better and better. If you get a chance, check out the web series about the online guild called the Knights of Good and both their online and very bizarre offline adventures. This book should be a good primer for the beginner and a great addition to the die-hard fan’s library. Can’t wait to read this one!

Nightwing Vol. 2: Night Of The Owls TP (DC Comics)
Nightwing Vol. 2: Night Of The Owls TP (DC Comics)

Picked by @chriscampbell8
Nightwing Vol. 2: Night Of The Owls TP (DC Comics)
Collects Nightwing #8-12 and #0, $14.99
As with many, I thoroughly enjoyed the Night of the Owls event that ran through the Batman family of books. And with this second volume of Nightwing, you get the best tie-ins to that event. The writing (Kyle Higgins) and the art (mostly Eddy Barrows) is all top-notch, but I have to applaud Higgins and his decision to introduce an ancestor of Dick Grayson as a Talon. So many possibilities! I hope everyone is already reading Nightwing (because Dick Grayson may be my favorite DC character), but if you’re not, this is a great TPB to pick up. And while you’re at it, grab the Night of the Owls TPB. Solid stuff here. And also included is the Nightwing #0 issue, which gives us a fresh (and condensed) origin of Dick. Turns out Dick was never a ward of Bruce’s!? Pick it up to find out more.

Back Issue! #66 - Bronze Age Team-Ups (TwoMorrows Publishing)
Back Issue! #66 – Bronze Age Team-Ups (TwoMorrows Publishing)

Picked by @adambesenyodi
Back Issue! #66 – Bronze Age Team-Ups (TwoMorrows Publishing), $8.95
If you’re a comic reader of a certain age, there is really no reason you shouldn’t be reading Back Issue! magazine. Published by TwoMorrows, the focus is squarely on the Bronze Age of Comics, that sweet spot loosely defined somewhere between the beginning of the 1970s through the mid-1980s. Some of the most prominent characteristics of that period in comics are team-ups and company crossovers, and this issue of Back Issue! focuses on both. Promising thoughtful commentary on titles like the Spider-Man-centric Marvel Team-Up and the FF’s The Thing starring in Marvel Two-In-One that helped define the period, Back Issue! does a great job scratching the nostalgic itch. Folded into this issue, look for additional features on the baxter-papered Chris Claremont written, Walter Simonson drawn, and Terry Austin inked Marvel and DC Present The Uncanny X-Men and The New Teen Titans, and Marvel’s Super-Villain Team-Up. Although Marvel was the standard-bearer for team-ups in the era, DC’s attempts don’t go unnoticed in this issue either. There are also features on the likes of DC Comics Presents, Super-Team Family, and Superman/Captain Marvel Smackdown. All this in digital or physical copy format under a new Austin-inked Gil Kane Marvel Superhero Team-up cover, you simply can’t go wrong! (Full disclosure note: Both CCL site proprietor Chris Marshall and I have contributed features to Back Issue! magazine over the years.)

Now it’s your turn. What books that came out this week do you recommend? Take a look at the sidebar to see this weeks collected edition releases.

Eisner Awards – Collected Editions

Eisner Awards
Eisner Awards

The Eisner Awards were announced yesterday and posted here are the short list of categories that pertain to reprints, collected editions and graphic novels. I will have a full length posts on What Should Win and What Will win closer to Comic-Con.

But for now, what do you think on the nominees?

Best Graphic Album—New
Building Stories, by Chris Ware (Pantheon)
Goliath, by Tom Gauld (Drawn & Quarterly)
The Hive, by Charles Burns (Pantheon)
Unterzakhn, by Leela Corman (Schocken)
You’ll Never Know, Book 3: A Soldier’s Heart, by C. Tyler (Fantagraphics)

Best Adaptation from Another Medium
Chico and Rita, by Fernando Trueba and Javier Mariscal (Self Made Hero)
Homer’s Odyssey, adapted by Seymour Chwast (Bloomsbury)
Richard Stark’s Parker: The Score, adapted by Darwyn Cooke (IDW)
Road to Oz, by L. Frank Baum, adapted by Eric Shanower and Skottie Young (Marvel)
A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeleine L’Engle, adapted by Hope Larson (FSG)

Best Graphic Album—Reprint
Cruisin’ with the Hound, by Spain (Fantagraphics)
Ed the Happy Clown, by Chester Brown (Drawn & Quarterly)
Everything Together: Collected Stories, by Sammy Harkham (PictureBox)
Heads or Tails, by Lilli Carré (Fantagraphics)
King City, by Brandon Graham (TokyoPop/Image)
Sailor Twain, or The Mermaid in the Hudson by Mark Siegel (First Second)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Strips
Alex Raymond’s Flash Gordon and Jungle Jim, vol. 2, edited by Dean Mullaney (IDW/Library of American Comics)
Mister Twee Deedle: Raggedy Ann’s Sprightly Cousin, by Johnny Gruelle, edited by Rick Marschall (Fantagraphics)
Percy Crosby’s Skippy, vol. 1, edited by Jared Gardner and Dean Mullaney (IDW/Library of American Comics)
Pogo, vol. 2: Bona Fide Balderdash, by Walt Kelly, edited by Carolyn Kelly and Kim Thompson (Fantagraphics)
Roy Crane’s Captain Easy: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips, vol. 3, edited by Rick Norwood (Fantagraphics)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Comic Books
Crime Does Not Pay Archives, edited by Philip Simon and Kitchen, Lind & Associates (Dark Horse)
David Mazzucchelli’s Daredevil Born Again: Artist’s Edition, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW)
Wally Wood’s EC Stories: Artist’s Edition, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW)
Walt Disney’s Uncle Scrooge: Only a Poor Old Man, by Carl Barks, edited by Gary Groth (Fantagraphics)
Young Romance: The Best of Simon & Kirby’s Romance Comics, edited by Michel Gagné (Fantagraphics)

Best Comics-Related Book
The Art of Daniel Clowes: Modern Cartoonist, edited by Alvin Buenaventura (Abrams ComicArts)
Marie Severin: The Mirthful Mistress of Comics, by Dewey Cassell (TwoMorrows)
Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, by Sean Howe (HarperCollins)
Mastering Comics, by Jessica Abel and Matt Madden (First Second)
Team Cul De Sac: Cartoonists Draw the Line at Parkinson’s, edited by Chris Sparks (Andrews McMeel)
Woodwork: Wallace Wood 1927–1981, edited by Frédéric Manzano (CasalSolleric/IDW)

Best Educational/Academic Work
Autobiographical Comics: Life Writing in Pictures, by Elisabeth El Refaie (University Press of Mississippi)
Comics Versus Art, by Bart Beaty (University of Toronto Press)
Crockett Johnson & Ruth Krauss: How an Unlikely Couple Found Love, Dodged the FBI, and Transformed Children’s Literature, by Philip Nel (University Press of Mississippi)
Lynda Barry: Girlhood Through the Looking Glass, by Susan E. Kirtley (University Press of Mississippi)
The Poetics of Slumberland, by Scott Bukatman (University of California Press)

Best Publication Design
Building Stories, designed by Chris Ware (Pantheon)
Dal Tokyo, designed by Gary Panter and Family Sohn (Fantagraphics)
David Mazzucchelli’s Daredevil Born Again: Artist’s Edition, designed by Randy Dahlk (IDW)
Mister Twee Deedle: Raggedy Ann’s Sprightly Cousin, designed by Tony Ong (Fantagraphics)
Wizzywig, designed by Ed Piskor and Chris Ross (Top Shelf)

Lastly, congratulations to TwoMorrow’s Publishing on their two nominations. Many of you know that I write for Back issue Magazine and I am very proud of the work that is published there.

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism
Alter Ego, edited by Roy Thomas (TwoMorrows)

Best Comics-Related Book
Marie Severin: The Mirthful Mistress of Comics, by Dewey Cassell (TwoMorrows)

6 Collected Editions Worthy Of Your Attention #8

Is there one book that is a “must have” that came out this week? My friends Andy Tom (@AndrewJTom), Chris Campbell (ChrisCampbell8), Marc Diefenderfer (@Dief88), Shane Hannafey, Adam Besenyodi (@adambesenyodi), and I (@ChrisCCL) are sharing six comic book collected editions, reprints and/or graphic novels released this week that you may be interested in.

Teen Titans Omnibus By Geoff Johns HC (DC Comics)
Teen Titans Omnibus By Geoff Johns HC (DC Comics)

Picked by @AndrewJTom
Teen Titans Omnibus By Geoff Johns HC (DC Comics)
For some reason I felt the need to get in shape for the spring. So…this past week, I started a daily exercise regimen consisting of a run on the treadmill and weightlifting. Subliminally though, it may have had something to do with seeing this massive heavyweight tome on the release list for this week. Back in the days before Infinite Crisis, Geoff Johns stepped into some pretty big shoes formerly worn by Marv Wolfman and George Perez. Not only did he have to live up to the reputation and expectations that Marv and George had set on Titans back in the 80s, but he had to do it without using mainstay Titans Dick Grayson, Wally West, and Donna Troy. Regardless of facing a gargantuan legacy, Johns crafted some outstanding stories which elevate his run to one of the most enjoyable books of it’s day. It’s really a fantastic run and gets collected (deservedly so) in this Omnibus format alongside Johns’ Flash volumes and Hawkman Omnibus. The Teen Titans Geoff Johns Omnibus clocks in at a whopping 1440 pages. It collects the entirety of Johns Titans run and takes the characters all of the way up to Infinite Crisis. This heavyweight contender will set you back about $150 at regular retail (before discounts), but be assured that you’ll get your money’s worth; and after a read it may even claim the coveted top prize of Heavyweight Champion.
Collects Teen Titans #1/2, #1-26, #29-46 and #50, Legends Of The DC Universe #2, Titans Secret Files #2, Teen Titans/Outsiders Secret Files 2003, Beast Boy #1-4, Teen Titans/Legion Of Super Heroes Special #1, Outsiders #24-25, Robin #147-147, Infinite Crisis #5-6 and Teen Titans Annual #1, 1,440 pages, $150.00

Punisher By Greg Rucka Volume 3 TPB (Marvel)
Punisher By Greg Rucka Volume 3 TPB (Marvel)

Picked by @ChrisCampbell8
Punisher By Greg Rucka Volume 3 TPB (Marvel)
Frank Castle is one of those characters that has enjoyed a great deal of popularity over the years, but yet seems to get his title relaunched constantly, whether in a new volume or a new mini-series. As a Punisher fan, I’m of two minds on the issue, but the upside for Marvel readers is that almost every time we get a new series, we get a new, or at least fresh, approach on the character. And Greg Rucka’s tour with Frank Castle is no different. This is certainly not FrankenCastle (worth reading, by the way) or Ennis or Baron, or any other recent approach on the character. No, this is Gotham Central meets Punisher and I am happy for that. We see Rachel Cole accepting her new role as she becomes hunted by the NYPD. This 3rd volume marks the final installment of the series, but is still worth reading for the glorious art by Marco Checchetto and the conclusion (or is it?) of Rachel’s story. As with many of my favorite Frank Castle stories, the plot is just a framework to tell the real story. I highly recommend this collection.
Collects The Punisher (2011) #11-16, $16.99

Avengers vs. Thanos TPB (Marvel)
Avengers vs. Thanos TPB (Marvel)

Picked by @adambesenyodi
Avengers vs. Thanos TPB (Marvel)Collecting nearly 500 pages of Marvel cosmic goodness, Avengers vs. Thanos is a great introduction to the Mad Titan and his initial epic clashes with Earth’s heroes. Regardless of whether you had to ask the geek next to you who the purple-skinned lover of Death was when you first saw him on the big screen, or you read these as single issues when they originally appeared in the early ’70s, it’s great to have these stories collected under one cover. Marvel has made it clear that Thanos is important to their universe and their future with the first post-credits stinger in the Avengers movie and with the first Avengers Assemble story arc last summer. That should be reason enough to pick up this primer on the would-be god, but the bonus is getting to revisit some great storytelling from likes of Jim Starlin and others.
Collects Iron Man (1968) #55, Captain Marvel (1968) #25-33, Marvel Feature (1971) #12, Daredevil (1964) #105-107, Avengers (1963) #125, Warlock (1972) #9-11 and #15, Avengers Annual (1967) #7, Marvel Two-In-One Annual #2, and material from Logan’s Run #6, $34.99

Tales From Beyond Science HC (Image)
Tales From Beyond Science HC (Image)

Picked by @Dief88
Tales From Beyond Science HC (Image), $34.99
Tales from Beyond Science is a collection of early-’90s one-off stories from 2000 AD, drawn by Rian Hughes and written by Alan McKenzie, John Smith, and a young Mark Millar. Similar to 2000 AD’s Future Shocks, these stories take on bizarre mysteries ranging from the Bermuda Triangle to the thirteenth calendar month. Maybe most exciting, though, this collection is completely re-lettered and includes newly colorized artwork and brand-new spoof covers by Hughes. For fans of the creators involved (or off-the-wall stories in general), Tales from Beyond Science should make for a worthwhile addition to your shelf.

Alter Ego #115 – 3-D Comics (TwoMorrow's Publishing)
Alter Ego #115 – 3-D Comics (TwoMorrow’s Publishing)

Picked by @ChrisCCL
Alter Ego #115 – 3-D Comics (TwoMorrow’s Publishing), $8.95
When you think of pop culture in 1950′s one of that comes to mind is 3-D movies. There were a gazillion of them made! Some good but mostly bad. Well the 3-D genre even crossed over into the comic books and what a hit it was! Roy Thomas’ Alter Ego magazine takes a “look” at the craze with this special issue featuring the work of  Jack Kirby, Joe Simon, Mort Meskin and Joe Kubert just to name a few.  It even comes with its’ own pair of 3-D glasses and if you decide to get the digital version of the mag, TwoMorrows will send you a the glasses for free!

and…

Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Jungle Adventure Vol. 3 HC (Marvel)
Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Jungle Adventure Vol. 3 HC (Marvel)

Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Jungle Adventure Vol. 3 HC (Marvel)
Ever since Tarzan, the African jungle has been a place of wild beasts, warlords and women. Wait! What? Yes, that’s right! Woman is the sex that you don’t want to mess with in deepest, darkest Africa. Presented here is the third Masterworks that showcases the Atlas Era Jungle Adventures of Lorna, Jann and Leopard Girl. Not to be out done, some of the manliest of men are also presented: Greg Knight (Lorna’s companion), Lo-Zar (a close look-a-like to Ka-Zar) and Waku, Prince of the Bantu (who may just remind you of T’Challa, The Black Panther). If it’s scantily mildly clad, postcode action you want, then Jungle Adventure is what you need! Featuring the great work of Joe Maneely, Don Rico, Syd Shores, John Romita, Carl Burgos, Don Heck, Jay Scott Pike and Christopher Rule.
Collects Lorna The Jungle Girl #13-16, Jungle Tales #5-7 and Jungle Action #4-6, $74.99

Now it’s your turn. What books that came out this week do you recommend? Take a look at the sidebar to see this weeks collected edition releases.

6 Collected Editions Worthy Of Your Attention #7

Is there one book that is a “must have” that came out this week? My friends Andy Tom (@AndrewJTom), Chris Campbell (ChrisCampbell8), Marc Diefenderfer (@Dief88), Shane Hannafey, Adam Besenyodi (@adambesenyodi), and I (@ChrisCCL) are sharing six comic book collected editions, reprints and/or graphic novels released this week that you may be interested in.

Secret Battles of Genghis Khan (IDW)
Secret Battles of Genghis Khan (IDW)

Picked by @AndrewJTom
Secret Battles of Genghis Khan (IDW), $21.99
I love world history. Especially dramatizations of history that are told in a format not all that dissimilar to a fictional account. In recent years, books like Petrograd have really captured my attention. Often times they may not be 100% accurate in their depiction, but the use of history to tell a compelling story is something I find fascinating. I suppose that somewhere deep within the recesses of my mind I’m thinking, “Yeah, it definitely could’ve happened that way.”
So last week I”m checking out the new releases and I see a book entitled “The Secret Battles of Genghis Khan”. I’ll admit that growing up in the 80s, I didn’t have much of a grasp on who Genghis Khan was aside from the guy with the sporting goods in Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure. I grew older and wiser. Many years later I watched the oscar nominated film, Mongol. I became fascinated with Genghis Khan; and was eager to learn more about the man. Fast forward a few years… imagine my excitement when I saw a book on the release schedule entitled “The Secret Battles of Genghis Khan”. At first I was hesitant, wondering how good it could be if I hadn’t even heard of it before. Then I saw that the writer was Daryl Gregory. That’s right, the same guy who took Planet of the Apes (a franchise that hadn’t been utilized in many years) and turned it into an outstanding comic. Gregory was able to take an otherwise “burned out” property and turn it into something special. Then I thought, “Imagine what this guy can do with a legend, some history and a character like Genghis Khan”. This book tells the story of Temudjin as he wages war from the Middle East all the way to the Pacific Ocean and the bloody battles that gave him his fearsome reputation. If you’re a history buff, a Conan reader, or a military enthusiast; you owe it yourself to pick this one up. Remember… before there was Conan, the world had the Legend of Genghis Khan.

Star Trek: The Next Generation / Doctor Who: Assimilation 2 Volume 2 (IDW)
Star Trek: The Next Generation / Doctor Who: Assimilation 2 Volume 2 (IDW)

Picked by Shane
Star Trek: The Next Generation / Doctor Who: Assimilation 2 Volume 2 (IDW), $17.99
Take the one of the oldest Scifi franchises in US history and one of the oldest Scifi franchises in UK history blend them together and what do you get? Like peanut butter and chocolate, two great tastes that go great together! Who would have thought this would have worked? There have been a lot of failed crossover attempts over the years, so when I read that Star Trek and Doctor Who were being melded together in comic book form, I was excited but cautious. The end product has definitely been a success, so if you haven’t read this already, with the release of this second volume, all the issues are now available in trade. Instead of going with the first crew of the Enterprise, IDW went with the Next Gen era of Star Trek and then took the latest incarnation of the doctor, as played by Matt Smith. Then they took some of the greatest foes of each franchise, the Borg and the Cybermen and thrust them upon our heroes. This melding was real obvious as you have two races with the same goal in mind; take all life forms and make them part of a collective whole that is part human, but more machine. Read how the crew of the USS Enterprise and the Tardis team take on these classic villains. This was a fun storyline and well worth the read! Check it out!

Darwin: A Graphic Biography (Smithsonian Books)
Darwin: A Graphic Biography (Smithsonian Books)

Picked by @adambesenyodi
Darwin: A Graphic Biography (Smithsonian Books), $9.95
Having a sixth-grade science nut in the house makes for an interesting perspective on things. (The number of hours he’s spent watching Mythbusters off the DVR, from Netflix, and on DVD would likely be staggering if calculated.) But that’s also what makes stuff like a graphic novel on the life of Charles Darwin a natural in our house. Originally produced in the UK in 2009 for the 200th anniversary of Darwin’s birth, Darwin: A Graphic Biography saw considerable exposure despite limited release. Now, Smithsonian Books has worked with writer Eugene Byrne and artist Simon Gurr to expand and repackage the content for a proper US release. If you can ignore the annoying “Ape TV” framing conceit, the story of Darwin’s life is presented in a way that should engage the middle school set enough to pass along some deep-thinking ideas, even if they aren’t necessarily looking for them.

Counter X Generation X Four Days TP (Marvel)
Counter X Generation X Four Days TP (Marvel)

Picked by @Dief88
Counter X Generation X Four Days TP (Marvel), $24.99
When the first X-Men movie was released in 2000, Marvel tried to boost sales by re-branding its X-Men titles under two major banners: “Revolution” for the ones that already sold fairly well, and “Counter X” for the rest. Unfortunately, the three Counter X titles lasted only two arcs before they were canceled (or, as was the case with X-Force, radically rebooted). One of the casualties was the long-running Generation X, and it’s the final five issues of that series that are collected in this trade. Interestingly, the first “Counter X” arcs for each series were collected way back in 2008, and it’s only now that Marvel has apparently decided to wrap them up; and that’s good news for us, because this trade contains some of Brian Wood’s earliest work on mainstream superhero comics. The team of mutant teenagers gets a fitting, if rather somber, send-off in these issues – one well worth reading if you’re interested in the characters or in seeing what Brian Wood was up to almost fifteen years ago.
Collects Generation X #71-75 and material from X-Men Unlimited (1993) #34

American Comic Book Chronicles: 1960-64 (TwoMorrows)
American Comic Book Chronicles: 1960-64 (TwoMorrows)

Picked by @ChrisCCL
American Comic Book Chronicles: 1960-64 (TwoMorrows), $39.95
Well the long wait is finally over. First announced at Comic Con International (San Diego) in 2009, The American Comic Book Chronicles is one of the most ambitious projects ever by TwoMorrows. Of course, TwoMorrows Publishing is no stranger to comic book history. Their numerous books and magazines have produced in-depth analysis and research regarding our favorite hobby – and for some of us, profession. The Chronicle are just that: A year-by-year and decade-by-decade look at the comic book publishing history. The one volume 1980s book was to be the first but for whatever reason we are getting 1960-64 as the first hardcover. Volume 2 of the 1960s should follow soon and it’s with noting that the 1940s will be a two volumes set, too. Since I’m a writer for Back Issue Magazine, I was able to get an advance copy and I can tell you it full of wonderful discussion and artwork from what is arguably the most important 5 years in all of comicdom.

and…

Marvel Firsts: WWII Super Heroes TP (Marvel)
Marvel Firsts: WWII Super Heroes TP (Marvel)

Marvel Firsts: WWII Super Heroes TP (Marvel), $39.99
So you’re interested in reading and learning more about the Golden Age Marvel Comics (Timely) heroes but don’t want to spend the money on expensive Masterworks? Well look no further then this new, wonderful and large sampler of GA material that showcases every notable hero. Marvel did this previously in a similar manner with the Golden Age of Marvel Comics Volumes 1-2 trade paperback set in 1999-2000. This new book does collect some of those stories but some new ones, too. It’s unfortunate that Marvel didn’t re-release the first 2 trades and simply just make a Volume 3. Instead Marvel decided to make the book as part of their Marvel Firsts line.  Still, it’s a nice introduction to some famous (Sub-Mariner, Captain America, Human Torch) and not so famous (Ferret, Dynamic Man, Marvel, Black Marvel, Blazing Skull, Red Raven, Patriot, Young Allies, Whizzer, Rockman, Jack Frost, Destroyer, Witness, Miss America) characters that have been lost in time. However, even better the characters may just be the artists and writers who worked on the books: Jack Kirby, Carl Burgos, Joe Simon, and Bill Everett just to name a few.
Collects Marvel Comics #1; Daring Mystery Comics #1-3, #5 and #7; Marvel Mystery Comics #4, #13, #28 and #49; Mystic Comics #1-2 and #4-7; Red Raven Comics #1; Captain America Comics #1, #6 and #13; Human Torch Comics #4; Young Allies Comics #1; and USA Comics #1-2

Now it’s your turn. What books that came out this week do you recommend? Take a look at the sidebar to see this weeks collected edition releases.