Tag Archives: bill everett

CCL Podcast #372 – Adopt A Character 2014

Marvel Masterworks Atlas Era Heroes Volume 3 Namor, The Sub-Mariner
Marvel Masterworks Atlas Era Heroes Volume 3 Namor, The Sub-Mariner

Collected Comics Library Podcast #372
29.6Mb; 31m 42s
Well it’s that time of year again, time to Adopt a Character, creator, genre or just about anything else in the world of comic books and get acquainted with it all year long. It’s more of a challenge than anything else, and it’s been a fun way to read something out of the norm or try something new.
Here’s the rundown of what I have picked in past years:

2007: Thor
2008: Luke Cage and Iron Fist
2009: The Spirit Archives Volumes 1-27
2010: Steve Ditko’s Spider-Man
2011: Silver Age X-Men
2012: Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D.
2013: Fantastic Four by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby

As you can see, it’s been mostly Marvel and that’s no different this time around. I’m going with Namor, The Sub-Mariner. I have all of the Masterworks, but I am going to forgo the Golden Age for now and start with Namor’s appearances in the Atlas Era and then move to his solo Silver Age adventures. Namor, of course, was created by the great Bill Everett and was with him all the way up until his death, a death that came all too soon. You may recall that Blake Bell has put together a very nice two-volume set of The Bill Everett Archives and the biography Fire & Water over at Fantagraphics. I read Volume 1, but have yet to read Volume 2. I think that is where I will begin. I will keep you posted throughout the year on my progress and for fun I will also be reading more of the Classic Valiant universe. More on that in the podcast.

Also on the show there’s a great question that I received from LinkedIn, of all places, on “What are the best Omnibus’ to buy?” – a loaded question, if there ever was one! That’s leads me to the unofficial announcement of the Infinity Gauntlet Omnibus due out in July. Here are the particulars (which are different from the Wikipedia entry):

Silver Surfer (1987) 34-38, 40, 44-60; Thanos Quest 1-2; Infinity Gauntlet 1-6; Cloak & Dagger (1988) 18; Spider-Man (1990) 17; Incredible Hulk 383-385; Dr. Strange, Sorceror Supreme 31-36; Quasar 26-27; Sleepwalker 7; 1248 pages; July 15, 2014

Lastly, I do a rundown of the contents included in Batman: The TV Stories. This book is on the heels of the excellent Batman ’66 comic and the companion book will add a “Biff! Bam! Zonk! Pow!” punch to your collected editions library. You’ll be surprised just how DC put together this very affordable, very fun trade.

Chris

Please visit my site sponsors: In-Stock Trades and Forbidden Planet International (UK)
and
The Official IDW T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents Forum – I’m the moderator!!!

6 Collected Editions Worthy Of Your Attention #35

Is there one book that is a “must have” collected edition that came out this week? My friends Andy Tom (@AndrewJTom), Chris Campbell (@ChrisCampbell8), Marc Diefenderfer (@Dief88), Shane Hannafey, Adam Besenyodi (@adambesenyodi), Joey Nazzari (@CaptDS9E), Wallace Ryan (@ReverendLove) and I (@ChrisCCL) are sharing some comic book collected editions, reprints and/or graphic novels released this week that you may be interested in.

S.H.I.E.L.D. By Steranko: The Complete Collection TP (Marvel)
S.H.I.E.L.D. By Steranko: The Complete Collection TP (Marvel)

Picked by @andrewjtom
S.H.I.E.L.D. By Steranko: The Complete Collection TP (Marvel)
Collects Nick Fury, Agent Of S.H.I.E.L.D. (1968) #1-3 and #5, and material from Strange tales (1951) #151-168, $34.99
Like most comic readers my age I have always heard about the greatness that is Jim Steranko. Steranko was always a bit elusive to me when I was growing up. His work existed within that nebulous region between Jack Kirby & Steve Ditko and guys like John Byrne, Walt Simonson, and Frank Miller. Like many creators, Steranko is a creator that I grew to appreciate later in life. With education and appreciation for the comics medium, I now look back and realize that Jim Steranko should’ve been in the conversation with Jack and Steve when I was a kid. His body of work (though small) is one of the most influential works by any creator. He crafted art that told stories using new and exciting techniques that we still see in modern comics today. This week, Marvel has released the S.H.I.E.L.D. by Steranko: The Complete Collection. This volume collects the entirety of Steranko’s Nick Fury stories. It’s a must have for any comics historian and a definite “buy” if you’ve been enjoying the recent Fury MAX.

East Of West, Vol. 1: The Promise TP (Image)
East Of West, Vol. 1: The Promise TP (Image)

Picked by @CaptDS9E
East Of West, Vol. 1: The Promise TP (Image)
Collects East Of West #1-5, $9.99
Every year there are always 3-4 new series that rise to the top, and get a lot of buzz. The few that get a lot of nominations come awards time. Last year it was Saga, this year it will be East of West. Published by Image Comics, Written by Johnathan Hickman and art by Nick Dragotta, these two creators have come up with a story that frankly feels like it was made just for me (just how I felt Saga was last year). East of West is a mashup of Western/Sci-Fi/alternate history, and a few other genres. The United States is not as we know it, as history took a different course. The Civil war ended differently leaving a union and confederate state, the Native American’s still have a strong presence, and many other different changes leaving the country split into 7 different large states. Many of the leaders from these states are working with three Horsemen of the Apocalypse to bring an end to the world as we know it. However as we know there is a fourth Horsemen, but this one has set out on his own, to stop their plans from coming to pass. That Horsemen is shockingly Death himself. Traveling with two strange companions, Death’s reasons for stopping them are at first a mystery, but as the first volume goes along we learn why he left the other Horsemen, and how they have something shocking tied to Death at the center of their plans. Something that could never be forgiven. And Death may not be the only ones who have decided that they do not like the way things are going
The story Hickman is weaving here is fantastic, like many of his other works, but Dragotta’s art is the star for me. There are so many different locales, and character types in this book, and he hit’s a home run with every single one. Wether it’s a Chinese city on the West Coast, a Futuristic Sci-Fi Tower in the Midwest, a dive bar with strange doings in the middle of nowhere, cool new vehicles, or just plan old desert, every single one is a joy to look at. I have gone back over issues just looking at the art work from key scenes to soak it all in. East of West is always moved to the top of my reading piles. And for $9.99 retail, there is no reason you should not give this fantastic series a chance.

Heroic Tales The Bill Everett Archives Volume 2 HC (Fantagraphics)
Heroic Tales The Bill Everett Archives Volume 2 HC (Fantagraphics)

Picked by @adambesenyodi
Heroic Tales The Bill Everett Archives Volume 2 HC (Fantagraphics), $39.99
When I was growing up and first discovering comics, my paternal grandmother gave me a handful of comics she’d saved from when my dad was a kid. What stood out among those half-dozen or so books – that included the likes of Classics Illustrated #58: Jack London’s Sea Wolf and Tales to Astonish #72 and #73 – was Sub-Mariner #33! That was my first conscious exposure to Bill Everett. And although his creation of Namor the Sub-Mariner and co-creation of Daredevil for Timely/Atlas/Marvel are his most bankable calling cards, Everett’s history with the medium is much farther-reaching. Now on volume 2, Fantagraphics continues to impress with their Bill Everett Archives series. This hardcover compendium follows the same format as the first volume (Amazing Mysteries) by pulling work primarily from the late 1930s and early 1940s that hasn’t been previously reprinted. The real find here, though, is a rare assemblage of Everett’s romance work in the early ’50s for Eastern Color’s New Heroic Comics and Personal Love. Ultimately, this series, edited by historian Blake Bell, serves as a companion of sorts to the Everett biography and art book Bell wrote and compiled in 2010. But the bottom line is that this book is a tremendous opportunity to archive and appreciate a master cartoonist.

P. Craig Russell's Opera Adaptations HC Set (NBM)
P. Craig Russell’s Opera Adaptations HC Set (NBM)

Picked by @ReverendLove
P. Craig Russell’s Opera Adaptations HC, Set of 3 Books (NBM), $59.99
I have loved P. Craig Russell’s work since I first saw it gracing the pages of Marvel’s “Killraven” and nothing he’s done in the past three decades has done anything to diminish my passion for the quiet Maestro. So, this week when his three book set of his “Library of Opera Adaptations” appeared at my local comic book shop, I had to have it!
These books were released singularly during the early years of this new century and I had always meant to purchase them but for one reason or another, had not yet added them to my library. The first book in the set, “the Magic Flute” adapts Mozart’s classic opera and is one of Russell’s more simple and sophisticated stories. The second volume starts with Russell’s “Parsifal” that saw print in the late 70′s from Star Reach Productions and has always been possibly my favourite of all his operatic adaptations. The book also has the “Songs of Mahler” and “Ariane & Bluebeard” along with a black and white piece called “the Clown (I Pagliacci)” to wind it up.
The final book in this series collects “Pellens & Melisande”, “Ein Heldentraum”, “the Godfather’s Code” and closes out this volume with Richard Strauss’s operatic adaptation of the Oscar Wilde play “Salome” as interpreted by Russell. I’d seen the story years ago when it was published by Eclipse and as with most of P. Craig Russell’s work, I fell in head over heels over it.
P. Craig Russell Library of Opera Adaptations is not for the average comic book aficionado but for those whose interests stray into other fields like opera or literature, these books are well worth exploring and falling in love with on first read. These three books are treasures filled with characters and stories from some of the greatest minds of all time and delivered with a graphic grace and elegance that could only have issued forth from the magic brush of P. Craig Russell.

Iron Man By Kurt Busiek and Sean Chen Omnibus HC (Marvel)
Iron Man By Kurt Busiek and Sean Chen Omnibus HC (Marvel)

Picked by @Dief88
Iron Man By Kurt Busiek and Sean Chen Omnibus HC (Marvel)
Collects Iron Man (1998) #1-25, Captain America (1998) #8, Quicksilver #10, Avengers (1998) #7, Iron Man & Captain America Annual 1998, Fantastic Four (1998) #15, Iron Man Annual 1999, Thor (1998) #17, Peter Parker: Spider-Man (1999) #11, Juggernaut: The Eighth Day and Iron Man: The Iron Age #1-2, 1024 pages, $125.00
What’s really great about the comics collected in this Omnibus is that they were created at a time when Marvel was walking a healthy line between telling extended storylines and maintaining a sense of accessibility for new readers. As a result, these issues play both to the “any issue could be someone’s first” mentality and the kind of intricate plotting that warrants collected editions of such massive size existing in the first place. In this series, which takes place immediately following Tony Stark’s return from the “Heroes Reborn” alternate universe, the character deals with a range of interwoven conflicts: trying to explain his months-long disappearance and recent sudden reappearance; the takeover of Stark Industries by another tech corporation; the threat of a mysterious new villain who calls himself the Arms Dealer; and, of course, personal drama among his supporting cast of Pepper Potts, Happy Hogan, Black Widow, and new love interest Rumiko Fujikawa. This is one of the great unsung Iron Man creative runs, and the perfect opportunity to get the whole thing in a single package.

Society Is Nix, Gleeful Anarchy At the Dawn of the American Comic Strip 1895-1915 (Sunday Press Books)
Society Is Nix, Gleeful Anarchy At the Dawn of the American Comic Strip 1895-1915 (Sunday Press Books)

Picked by @ChrisCCL
Society Is Nix, Gleeful Anarchy At the Dawn of the American Comic Strip 1895-1915 (Sunday Press Books), $125.00
If you’re at all like me (and I hope you are because you come by this awesome blog) then you’ll have an appreciation for old comic strips. But not just any “old strips” — really old strips. Well thank God for Pete Maresca and his Sunday Press Books imprint. Pete has gathered up another fine collection of Sunday newspaper comics in Society Is Nix, Gleeful Anarchy At the Dawn of the American Comic Strip much of which has not see the light of day since they were first published over 100 years ago! Pete has been publishing these “Platinum Age” comics for some time now and he was also a guest on Podcast #307. There are over 150 original size comics, by over 50 cartoonists. That’s right, the book is 16×21. Don’t let the $125 tag scare you, history is priceless.

Now it’s your turn. What books that came out this week do you recommend? Take a look at the sidebar to see this weeks collected edition releases.

6 Collected Editions Worthy Of Your Attention #34

Is there one book that is a “must have” collected edition that came out this week? My friends Andy Tom (@AndrewJTom), Chris Campbell (@ChrisCampbell8), Marc Diefenderfer (@Dief88), Shane Hannafey, Adam Besenyodi (@adambesenyodi), Joey Nazzari (@CaptDS9E), Wallace Ryan (@ReverendLove) and I (@ChrisCCL) are sharing some comic book collected editions, reprints and/or graphic novels released this week that you may be interested in.

Nova Vol. 1: Origin Premiere HC (Marvel)
Nova Vol. 1: Origin Premiere HC (Marvel)

Picked by @andrewjtom
Nova Vol. 1: Origin Premiere HC (Marvel)
Collects Nova (2013) #1-5 and material from Marvel Now! Point One #1, $24.99
Y’know, I really have no knowledge of the Marvel Cosmic line. I know of a character named Nova, and I’ve heard how great Abnett & Lanning’s Guardians of the Galaxy run was. Outside of that, I’ve really never had much of an exposure to that stuff. This new Nova collection is tailor-made for guys like me. Say what you will about Jeph Loeb’s stories (I know that he has his haters), but the man knows how to craft a fun & entertaining story (Commando wasn’t exactly Schindler’s List). With this book Loeb seems to have produced another fun “popcorn” style story. He brings along his frequent collaborator, (the immensely talented) Ed McGuinness for what seems to be a story about a young coming of age hero who has been blessed with great power and great responsibility (sound familiar?). The nice thing about guys like Jeph Loeb and Ed McGuinness, is that they know that not every comic needs to be “high art”. Sometimes, comics should just be a lot of fun; and they excel at making fun comics. Go out and try this out… and remember to have a good time reading it.

Classic Space: 1999 – To Everything That Was (Archaia)
Classic Space: 1999 – To Everything That Was (Archaia)

Picked by @adambesenyodi
Classic Space: 1999 – To Everything That Was (Archaia), $24.95
The very definition of cult TV show, Space: 1999 was a British import on these shores in the mid-’70s. On the premise of a nuclear age cautionary tale, the show centered on the inhabitants of Moonbase Alpha, who are stranded in space when the nuclear waste humanity was storing on the far side of the Moon explodes on September 13, 1999, hurtling the Moon out of the Earth’s orbit and on an interplanetary journey. Since Hanna-Barbara owned the merchandising rights to the classic TV show, it made sense that the comics licensing went to Charlton Comics, who had an existing relationship in place. Bronze Age Charlton Comics boasted a pretty damn impressive bullpen of top-notch talent and licensed properties, with John Byrne, Roger Stern, and Bob Layton all producing work for the venerable imprint. And titles like The Six Million Dollar Man and The Bionic Woman could be found alongside Space: 1999 on the roster. Carrying a “Selected Remastered Works from the Comic Archives, 1975-1979” subtitle, Archaia has rescued myriad Space: 1999 artifacts and presented them here, including selections from the Charlton series and from the British children’s magazine Look-In. The collection is in continuity between the first and second seasons of the TV show, and features an absolutely gorgeous, previously unpublished Gray Morrow painted cover (the kind Charlton could be counted on for producing in most all of their ’70s titles).

Once Upon a Time -  Shadow Of The Queen Premiere HC (Marvel)
Once Upon a Time – Shadow Of The Queen Premiere HC (Marvel)

Picked by Shane
Once Upon a Time –  Shadow Of The Queen Premiere HC (Marvel), $19.99
The beauty of having so many companies under your umbrella is that not only do you have crossover potential, but a means to get your product out there in so many different forms of media. Disney’s ownership of Marvel means comic adaptations and/or original stories from their many properties. Some of which might not be feasible or cost effective to tell in the television format. We saw this happen with Castle. Marvel did a great job with a couple of graphic novels, not necessarily based on the TV series, but based on the” writings” of the main character, a best-selling author. These were stories that would have probably never been told on television. We are also seeing the reverse, whereas ABC is launching the Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. TV series this fall. With the universe of Once Upon a Time, there is an incredible amount of material with which Marvel can play mine from. After two seasons, I’m still really enjoying this TV series a lot. Not only have they turned fairy tales upside down and given me stories that are familiar yet different, they have also taken it from a Disney perspective. So, while the comic book series Fables (another favorite of mine) has its own versions of these classic characters, almost everyone knows of the Disney versions, even if they aren’t comic book readers. This TV series did a great job of taking those beloved characters and interweaving their stories into a bigger tale that ropes in viewers both young and old and still changing things up to give you an entirely different experience. If you haven’t seen the TV series, I say give it a try. While the series has a huge array of characters from fairy tales, the main story is predominantly about the Evil Queen and Snow White. This first ever graphic novel tie in is a story about the Evil Queen, her quest to capture Snow White and the Huntsman she uses to help her with her devious plan. This should be a fun book whether you are a fan of the TV series or just a fan of classic fairy tales. Check it out!

Avengers: Endless Wartime OGN-HC (Marvel)
Avengers: Endless Wartime OGN-HC (Marvel)

Picked by @Dief88
Avengers: Endless Wartime OGN-HC (Marvel), $24.99
Marvel’s “Season One” graphic novels must have sold pretty well, because now the company has set out to publish a new series of OGNs (this time set in current Marvel continuity), starting with Avengers: Endless Wartime. These books will apparently boast higher-profile creators than “Season One” did; for Endless Wartime, we get Warren Ellis and Mike McKone. All Marvel has revealed about the plot is that it involves a villain from Captain America’s past, though whether this villain is an established character or a brand-new one has yet to be revealed. It’s also unclear at this point exactly how self-contained Endless Wartime will be, or to what extent it will be referred to in the ongoing Avengers comics. Ideally, in my opinion, this book would lean toward the former. Either way, though, I’m interested to see what direction Ellis and McKone take with this book.

Heroic Tales The Bill Everett Archives Volume 2 HC (Fantagraphics)
Heroic Tales The Bill Everett Archives Volume 2 HC (Fantagraphics)

Picked by @ChrisCCL
Heroic Tales The Bill Everett Archives Volume 2 HC (Fantagraphics), $39.99
I didn’t know much about Bill Everett other than he created Namor The Submariner and Daredevil until I picked up Blake Bell’s Bill Everett Archives Volume 1. Bell is the one of the best curators of classic, hard to find material and refreshing it for the 21st Century audience, just look at his Steve Ditko Archives series. Well now, Bell is back with a second go around with Everett and from what I hear, the comics here are superior to what we saw in Volume 1. If that’s the case, then we are all in for a real treat!

and…

Conan Red Nails Original Art Archives HC (Genesis West)
Conan Red Nails Original Art Archives HC (Genesis West)

Conan Red Nails Original Art Archives HC (Genesis West), $150.00
I’ve never heard of Genesis West publishing until I saw the solicit for this book. From what I dug up this is similar to the Artist’s Editions being published by IDW. This particular Conan tale “concerns Conan encountering a lost city in which the degenerate inhabitants are proactively resigned to their own destruction.” – Wikipedia; and was originally told from Robert E. Howard in his last Conan story he wrote and the last major fantasy he completed, in Weird Tales magazine from July to October 1936. This comic adaptation is from Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith for Savage Tales #2-3 (Marvel, Oct. 1973 and Feb. 1974)). It has also been reprinted in collected edition form many times since then, both in black-and-white and in full color, by Marvel and more recently by Dark Horse The Chronicles of Conan: Volume 4: The Song of Red Sonja and Other Stories (Dark Horse Comics, 2004). Is this worth $240.00? Hmmmm…I’m not sure. If you see it in the wild or buy it let me know.

Now it’s your turn. What books that came out this week do you recommend? Take a look at the sidebar to see this weeks collected edition releases.

CCL Podcast #311 – Interview with Blake Bell; Steve Ditko and Bill Everett Archives

Collected Comics Library Podcast #311
27 Mb; 58m 37s

I’ve been meaning to have Blake Bell on the podcast ever since I did my Steve Ditko retrospective in February, 2010. You can consider this, Part 5, if you would like, but we also talk about another icon – Bill Everett, who created Namor, The Sub-Maniner and co-created Daredevil.

It’s a candid discussion on what made the 1950′s such a special time for comic books and the toll it sometimes took. Blake talks about their lives and the fast paced industry that kicked off the Marvel (Silver) Age of comics. We also discuss Blake’s other works including the 2011 Eisner nominated (Best Comics-Related Book) Fire and Water: Bill Everett, the Sub-Mariner, and the Birth of Marvel Comics, I Have To Live With This Guy! (TwoMorrows Publishing), Strange and Stranger: The World of Steve Ditko, The Steve Ditko Archives series and the upcoming Amazing Mysteries: The Bill Everett Archives Volume 1.

I want to sincerely thank Blake, and Fantagraphics,  for coming on the podcast!

Sunday Review: Fire and Water: Bill Everett, The Sub-Mariner and the Birth of Marvel Comics

It’s no surprise that I’m a big fan of classic comic books and thanks to the Marvel Masterworks and DC Archives for their Golden Age reprints, I got to enjoy these rarely seen comic books of the past. It’s no surprise why, these days, they are largely forgotten, the writing was simplistic and the art is sometimes a mis-mash, so it takes a different level of appreciation. Today, we the reader, expect more, but that’s due in large part of the evolution of the comic.

Image my surprise when I first came across the Masterworks Atlas Era Heroes books. Here I thought I was getting the greatness that I came to expect from guys like Steve Ditko, Jack Kirby and Stan Lee in the Silver Age, but no, it was just a rehash of Captain America, Human Torch and Sub-Mariner. But today, I have come to repent from my sins and bad reviews, thanks in large part to, the 2011 Eisner nominated (Best Comics-Related Book), Blake Bell’s Fire & Water: Bill Everett and the Birth of Marvel Comics. My view, just a few sort years ago, was skewed on the way I saw “classic” Cap, Torch and Namor because I didn’t understand the era, the 50′s revival and the creators. As I said, comics are ever changing; influences from current events, politics, war, science, and a whole host of other subjects. Comic books are a reflection of our lives and Bill Everett took us through time with his signature character, The Sub-Mariner.

Everett created the Sub-Mariner for Timely Comics in Motion Picture Funnies Weekly (April, 1939) and later in Marvel Comics #1 (October, 1939), two years before his National (DC Comics) counterpart Aquaman. Namor, along side Human Torch by Carl Burgos, Angel by Paul Gustavson and Ka-Zar by Ben Thompson fought crime, corruption and later Nazi’s in their own tales of heroism. Looking back on it now, it was who’s who of talent! Namor would go on to have a wonderful Golden Age run including 80 issues of Marvel Mystery Comics, 32 in his own Sub-Mariner Comics and be featured in The Human Torch (40 issues) and All-Winners (20 issues). But like all things the demise of superhero books came the end of Namor. Or so we thought!

Bell is our guide into this rich history of Bill Everett; good times and in bad, out of work and overloaded with deadlines even on the brink of death at a young age thanks to tuberculosis. He not only created Namor at age 22, but also is one of the few men to begin at Timely, survive Atlas and prosper at Marvel Comics. That’s right, The Sub-Mariner would be revived along with Captain America and Human Torch in 1953′s Young Men. Namor would go on to head his own title, Sub-Mariner Comics #33-42 (April 1954 – Oct. 1955), with Everett at every step of the way. A good thing, too, because of all the Atlas Heroes work, the Sub-Mariner is the best of the lot! Namor would return yet again in the Silver Age pages of Fantastic Four #4 (May 1962), getting saved by Johnny Storm’s Human Torch and then just a two years later Namor would help revive the original Captain America, Steve Rogers, in Avengers #4 (March, 1964). Everett at this time co-created and worked on Daredevil #1, but would do pencils, writing and even inking his signature character in Tales To Astonish and Sub-Mariner in the 1970′s. Bill Everett passed away at age 55 on February 27, 1973.

Bell includes several pieces of artwork and comics that has rarely been seen. A true testament to a man who lived comics throughout his entire life and loved it with a passion, especially when it comes to Sub-Mariner. The book is split up in to five chapters and includes an introduction, art gallery and endnotes. One fascinating piece of information is, that only once did Everett do pencils and inks for DC Comics: the six-page, “Diary Of An Ace!” written by Bob Haney in All American Men of War #77 (1966).

As I look back on the Golden Age and Atlas Era, yes it was a more simple time with more simple comics, perhaps not with horror, but definitely with superheros. The guys who were drawing and writing were young and inexperienced, but they paved the way for the Brian Michael Bendis’ and Geoff Johns’ of today. This includes the greats like Lee, Kirby, Joe Simon, John Romita, and Russ Heath all of whom helped shape Marvel Comics into the company and characters that we love. I reiterate, it’s important not only to remember the characters, but the men behind them. Bell’s book here on the life and times of Bill Everett, and his other biographical material on Steve Ditko, is a testament to that. More Everett is on the way from Bell in Amazing Mysteries: The Bill Everett Archives Volume 1, which will collect work from Amazing Mystery Funnies, Amazing-Man Comics, Target Comics, Heroic Comics and Blue Bolt Comics. I believe it will debut at Comic Con in July so dust off your shelf and save a place next to your Steve Ditko Archives.

Fire and Water: Bill Everett, The Sub-Mariner and the Birth of Marvel Comics
By Blake Bell
216 pages, $39.99, Fantgraphics

Recommended reading:
Golden and Silver Age Sub-Mariner
Atlas Era Sub-Mariner