6 Collected Editions Worthy Of Your Attention #12

Is there one book that is a “must have” that came out this week? My friends Andy Tom (@AndrewJTom), Chris Campbell (ChrisCampbell8), Marc Diefenderfer (@Dief88), Shane Hannafey, Adam Besenyodi (@adambesenyodi), and I (@ChrisCCL) are sharing six comic book collected editions, reprints and/or graphic novels released this week that you may be interested in.

The Unauthorized Tarzan HC by Joe Gill and Sam Glanzman (Dark Horse)

The Unauthorized Tarzan HC by Joe Gill and Sam Glanzman (Dark Horse)

Picked by @AndrewJTom
The Unauthorized Tarzan HC by Joe Gill and Sam Glanzman (Dark Horse)
Way back in the glory days of Charlton Comics, a little known “scandal” went down. Like any good publishing company of that time, Charlton Comics saw an opportunity to use one of pop culture’s most popular adventure heroes (Tarzan) for their own financial gain. Charlton knew that the freedom granted them by utilizing a character in the “public domain”, they could tell the stories that they wanted to with little to no repercussion from the creators of characters like Tarzan. Charlton recruited Captain Atom creator, Joe Gill and popular war comics illustrator, Sam Glanzman to craft all new stories of Lord Greystoke. However, Charlton made a crucial mistake in their plans to make Tarzan a top selling comic. At that time in history, Tarzan wasn’t in the “public domain”. After only for issues, Charlton was ordered to cease publication of their all new Tarzan series and most of the remaining issues were destroyed. Both Joe Gill and Sam Glanzman would go on to other work, but never again were those “illegal” Tarzan stories reprinted… until now that is. Thanks to  Dark Horse Comics, they’ve collected these four issues in a handsome hardcover edition. These stories can finally be shared with an all new generation of Tarzan fans. Even though Tarzan is now in the public domain, this Dark Horse reprint has been given the blessing of the Burroughs estate and will see print for the first time since it’s initial release from Charlton. Now wait… I know that $29.99 sounds like a lot of money, especially for a four issue run of comics, so Dark Horse has tossed in some additional Sam Glanzman goodness by including material from Glanzman’s Tarzan strip-art as well. Lastly, for the true Tarzan collector, Dark Horse is offering a Limited Edition (250 copies) for $59.99 featuring a “tip-in” signed by Sam Glanzman (you can get this while they last at www.instocktrades.com). I can’t imagine that this one will stay in print for very long, so snatch this up while you can.
Collects Charlton’s Jungle Tales of Tarzan #1-4, $29.99; Limited Edition, $59.99

Deadpool Classic Vol. 8 TPB (Marvel)

Deadpool Classic Vol. 8 TPB (Marvel)

Picked by @Dief88
Deadpool Classic Vol. 8 TPB (Marvel)
You have to admire the commitment Marvel has shown to publishing this line; I think Deadpool Classic has the most volumes of any Marvel Classic TPB series to date. This volume holds a particularly special place in my heart, though, because it collects the first issues of Deadpool that I ever read. Although it’s technically the eighth volume of the series, this book actually stands perfectly well on its own, since it collects writer Frank Tieri’s entire run on the title. The story begins as a follow-up to Tieri’s contemporaneous run on Wolverine (which, sadly, has never been fully collected), but evolves into the best character study of Deadpool since the series’ early issues. I’ve gone back to these issues many times over the years, and I look forward to now having them on my bookshelf for years to come.
Collects Deadpool #57-64, $24.99

Invincible Iron Man Vol. 10: Long Way Down TPB (Marvel)

Invincible Iron Man Vol. 10: Long Way Down TPB (Marvel)

Picked by Shane
Invincible Iron Man Vol. 10: Long Way Down TPB (Marvel)
Old Shellhead has always been my favorite Marvel character. Like DC’s Batman, he is an ordinary man with extraordinary intellect and A LOT of money. He makes you feel like someone with the right brains, money and wherewithal could actually become a superhero. I have every single floppy of his solo series from issue #1 to the end of the Invincible Iron Man run. This story arc, collecting issues 516-520 comes just before the final one of the series and the beginning of Marvel Now Iron Man. I have really enjoyed Matt Fraction’s runs on Iron Man and my other favorite Marvel hero, Thor. This story pretty much has it all. Tony Stark is still dealing with the aftermath of getting drunk for the first time in years. The Government is against him, the super villain team of the Mandarin, Ezekiel Stane and Justine Hammer are against him, almost everyone is against him. Iron Man is shut down by Hammer, but a new Iron Man has emerges while Mandarin works on his plan for world domination. You get lots of action and intrigue and a cliffhanger ending that sets up the final act of Invincible Iron Man. A must read!
Collects Invincible Iron Man #516-520, $16.99

Leonard Starr's Mary Perkins On Stage Volume 11 TP (Classic Comics Press)

Leonard Starr’s Mary Perkins On Stage Volume 11 TP (Classic Comics Press)

Picked by @ChrisCCL
Leonard Starr’s Mary Perkins On Stage Volume 11 TP (Classic Comics Press)
Often overlooked in the world of comics is the prolific artist and writer Leonard Starr. His long history includes the Golden Age Human Torch and Sub-Mariner, a stop at EC Comcis and Marvel and even as a developer for the 1980′s classic animated Thundercats. But he is most known for Mary Perkins, On Stage; a strip he created that ran from February, 1957 to September 9, 1979. It was a soap opera that blended in adventure and humor. Starr won the National Cartoonists Society’s Story Comic Strip Award in 1960 and 1963, and the Reuben Award in 1965. Charles Pelto and his Classic Comics Press has been putting together collected editions of the strip and is now on Volume 11. For more, I interviewed, Mr. Pelto for Podcast #300 back in 2011.
November 1, 1970 to June 11, 1972 with an introduction by Howard Chaykin, $24.95

and…

Superman: The Death and Return of Superman Omnibus HC (DC Comics)

Superman: The Death and Return of Superman Omnibus HC (DC Comics)

Superman: The Death and Return of Superman Omnibus HC (DC Comics)
He’s the most iconic superhero ever – and now his is dead.
Back in 1988, when the Death Of Superman happened, the whole world reflected. It was covered on the nightly news and in Time magazine. There were even vigils held at comic book stores. Sales of the event soared and it was critiqued left and right. Since then it has become an evergreen for DC Comics. It’s been reprinted a few different times; mostly the main story in trade paperback which is Action Comics 684; Adventures of Superman 497; Justice League of America 69; Superman vol. 2, 74-75; Superman: The Man of Steel 18-19; one page each from Action Comics 683, Adventures of Superman 496, Superman 73, and Superman: The Man of Steel 17. But that’s not all, two other stroylines made it a trilogy: World Without a Superman and The Return of Superman. In 2007 all three were collected in The Death and Return of Superman Omnibus, but now DC has expanded the story even more to include the full issues of Action Comics 683, Adventures of Superman 496, Superman 73, and Superman: The Man of Steel 17 and not just the one page excerpts that were previously collected. So to wrap it all up – this is the one complete volume.
Collects Superman: The Man Of Steel #17-26, Superman #73-82, Adventures Of Superman #496-505, Action Comics #683-691, Justice League America #69, Superman: The Legacy Of Superman #1 And Green Lantern #46, 1,008 pages, $99,99

and…

Wonder Woman: The Amazon Princess Archives Volume 1 HC (DC Comics)

Wonder Woman: The Amazon Princess Archives Volume 1 HC (DC Comics)

Wonder Woman: The Amazon Princess Archives Volume 1 HC (DC Comics)
As one looks at where DC Comics deems to start the Silver Age of Comics, the old argument is between Martian Manhunter (J’onn J’onzz) in Detective Comics #225 from November 1955 and Flash (Barry Allen) in Showcase #4 from October 1956. I tend to go with The Flash. Superman entered the Silver age with Action Comics #241, June 1958 and Superman #122, July 1958. But Batman was late to the game: Detective Comics #27, May 1964 and Batman #164, June 1964.
DC has collected the Silver Age Wonder Woman in four Showcase Presents volumes, to date, but this is the first time these adventures have been collected as an Archive Edition. The significance of her first Silver Age story (Wonder Woman #98, May 1958) is that it the original artist, Harry G. Peter was replaced by Ross Andru and Mike Esposito. As a point if fact, Wonder Woman ended her run in Sensation Comics #73, January 1948.
Collects Wonder Woman #98-110, $75.00

Now it’s your turn. What books that came out this week do you recommend? Take a look at the sidebar to see this weeks collected edition releases.

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