6 Collected Editions Worthy Of Your Attention #11

Is there one book that is a “must have” that came out this week? My friends Andy Tom (@AndrewJTom), Chris Campbell (ChrisCampbell8), Marc Diefenderfer (@Dief88), Shane Hannafey, Adam Besenyodi (@adambesenyodi), and I (@ChrisCCL) are sharing six comic book collected editions, reprints and/or graphic novels released this week that you may be interested in.

Hawkeye, Vol. 1: My Life as a Weapon (Marvel)
Hawkeye, Vol. 1: My Life as a Weapon (Marvel)

Picked by @AndrewJTom
Hawkeye, Vol. 1: My Life as a Weapon (Marvel)
Those of you that read last week’s column know how much of an Ed Brubaker fan that I am. One of my favorite Ed Brubaker works is the brilliant and often under-appreciated “Immortal Iron Fist” from Marvel Comics. Iron Fist teamed Brubaker up with Matt Fraction (co-writer) and artist, David Aja. Together this team would produce a critically acclaimed series that redefined the character of Iron Fist and made him relevant for a modern audience. Enter 2012, and 2 thirds of the Iron Fist team has been reunited on Marvel’s Hawkeye (minus Brubaker). Critical reviews praising Fraction and Aja’s work on this title have been numerous and plentiful ever since it’s debut. Fraction crafts a story about Hawkeye’s life as Clint Barton, and not a swashbuckling super hero in a purple costume. Fraction portrays Hawkeye as a real person. He allows the reader insight into why this character is much more than he’s ever been portrayed in the pages of Avengers while over shadowed by Norse gods, living legends, and technological marvels. Never had I thought that I’d be buying a Hawkeye collected edition, but I’ll definitely be picking this one up.
Collects Hawkeye (2012) #1-5 and Young Avengers Presents #6, $16.99

Star Wars The Clone Wars Defenders Of The Lost Temple TP (Dark Horse)
Star Wars The Clone Wars Defenders Of The Lost Temple TP (Dark Horse)

Picked by @adambesenyodi
Star Wars The Clone Wars Defenders Of The Lost Temple TP (Dark Horse)
If there is one thing the Star Wars franchise did right, it was the Clone Wars TV show on Cartoon Network. We watched every season as a family in our house, and it’s because the show managed to pull off the one trick Episodes I through III were never able to do: Make me care about the prequel era characters. Dark Horse has done a nice job of translating the look and feel of the show over to these digest-sized trade paperbacks, and the kiddo has picked up most of them over the years. They are in-continuity with the series, which served double-duty by adding dimension to the characters on the show and adding weight to the stories in the books. With the news this week that the TV show has been, in effect, canceled, I have a feeling I might be pulling this one and others off the kiddo’s bookshelf a little more often to revisit this world. (Small world/full disclosure note: Writer Justin Aclin was one of the editors I worked with years ago when I freelanced for ToyFare magazine.)
Set during season 4 of the animated series, $7.99

Chew Omnivore Edition HC Vol 3 (Image)
Chew Omnivore Edition HC Vol 3 (Image)

Picked by ChrisCampbell8
Chew Omnivore Edition HC Vol 3 (Image)
If your buying habits are anything like mine, you’ll find yourself double-dipping (or even triple-dipping) on certain titles. Maybe I couldn’t wait for the floppy, so I grabbed the digital copy while still in my pajamas on Wednesday morning (like with Batman Inc. issue 8). Or maybe I had some TPBs of Sandman and then the Absolutes descended on us without mercy for us or our wallets. Or maybe you’ve been reading Chew in single issues since the first issue, you’ve passes on the TPBs, but John Layman and Rob Guillory have made the wise decision to make available oversized hardcovers collecting 12 issues at a time. If you’ve ever spoken with me, you know this is my preferred purchasing path — single issues (digital or paper) followed by a 12-issue oversized hardcover. So this brings us to the 3rd volume of the Chew Omnivore Edition. Whether you’ve been reading this in single issues or not at all, fear not, this is a can’t-miss collection. This series keeps getting more and more absurd and hilarious, which is a great thing. And you also get the Secret Agent Poyo one-shot! Apologies for not spoiling any plot twists or developments in this collection, but you really have to experience the mega-arc of Major League Chew and Space Cakes for yourself. Tony and his twin sister Toni go to some strange places, and you should go with.
Collects Chew #21-30 and Chew: Secret Agent Poyo, $34.99

Avengers Season One Premiere HC (Marvel)
Avengers Season One Premiere HC (Marvel)

Picked by @Dief88
Avengers Season One Premiere HC (Marvel), $24.99
Marvel’s “Season One” graphic novels may have seemed like a shameless rip-off of DC’s “Earth One” books when they were first announced, but they actually started fairly strong and have only come into their own even more since then. I’ve read several of them, and I haven’t been disappointed yet. (My favorite is still the first one, Fantastic Four: Season One.) Most of the Season One books have featured lesser known (but good!) creators so far, but Avengers has a bit more star power, with Peter David on writing duties and art by the wonderful Andrea Di Vito. Will it hold a candle to the revised Avengers origin stories told in the last few years by Joe Casey, Brian Bendis, and others? I’m not sure yet, but I’m definitely willing to give it a shot.

Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 8 Library Edition Volume 4 HC (Dark Horse)
Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 8 Library Edition Volume 4 HC (Dark Horse)

Picked by Shane
Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 8 Library Edition Volume 4 HC (Dark Horse), $49.99
Although I’m both a comics fan and a SciFi/horror fan, they don’t always go hand in hand. I LOVE Star Wars, but really hadn’t collected the comics since the Marvel run when I was younger. Over the years, things changed, as did my consumption of stories from my favorite franchises. I now read a lot more of the Dark Horse Star Wars comics. Like Star Wars, I didn’t originally read Buffy comics. But that was mainly because I didn’t watch the show, so I had no interest in the comics. Now I was a rabid fan of Firefly by Joss Whedon and it showed me some of the greatness in his creations. A western in space was much more interesting to me then a teenage girl killing vampires. Buffy Season 8 came at a great time for me. A lot of people had raved about the greatness of the Buffy the Vampire Slayer TV series, while I wrote it off as fluff for years. A friend of mine tired of hearing my excuses, bought me season one for a gift. So, knowing my friend’s tastes and my love of Whedon’s other creation, I sat down and gave it a try. While most fans will tell you season one isn’t the strongest, it does hook you in. So, I picked up season two, and thus started my LOVE for Buffy the Vampire Slayer. I just kept getting the seasons one by one until I finished the series. The show is fantastic! This was a little before season 8 became available, so of course when it hit the stands, I jumped on it. Now I was a fan. More Buffy please!! What season 8 did was flesh out a much more elaborate universe. One that wasn’t that held captive by the budget of a television series. Things like a giant size Dawn (Buffy’s sister) and a tie-in to Whedon’s futuristic slayer tale, Fray (also a great read). It also took the action to a global scale, so it wasn’t just tied to Sunnydale. Most importantly, it had Whedon’s writing in the first story arc and his input throughout the series, so I trusted it would stay true to his vision. This series had some incredible imagery and fun storylines that continued and expanded the ongoing story of Buffy and her crew. This penultimate volume of the library series finishes the season 8 run with issues 31-40 as well as the Riley one shot. There are some good surprises in this finale that I don’t want to spoil so read it, because if you are a fan of Buffy, you are doing yourself a disservice not reading this fine run. And what better way to do so, then with these library editions? Beautiful oversize hardcovers loaded with content. This is the reason I’ve almost stopped getting monthlies altogether and just wait for the best possible package with which to purchase the material I want to own.

Mickey Spillane’s From the Files of Mike Hammer The Complete Dailies and Sundays Volume 1 (Hermes Press)
Mickey Spillane’s From the Files of Mike Hammer The Complete Dailies and Sundays Volume 1 (Hermes Press)

Picked by @ChrisCCL
Mickey Spillane’s From the Files of Mike Hammer: The Complete Dailies and Sundays Volume 1 (Hermes Press)
Dad’s can teach you about many things: cars, girls, and how to throw a curve. My dad helped me in many aspects of life including the finer points of TV cops shows. Growing up I remember he watched them all including Barney Miller, Rockford Files, Streets Of San Francisco, and Mike Hammer – who was the toughest of them all. Stacey Keach played the hard-boiled detective starting in 1984 at the age of 43. I’m 42 and nowhere near the level of being a bad-ass like Keach was. The show was overseen by the creator of the character Mickey Spillane and that’s why it was so true to the pulp roots. Little did I know that there was a short lived comic strip of Mike Hammer until I saw the solicitation from Hermes Press a few months ago. The strip was done in collaboration with Joe Gill who was a long time Charlton Comics contributor with Steve Ditko. This book also has an introduction from noted mystery writer Max Allan Collins (Road to Perdition). I am all over this book and any fan of detective pulps, or even the TV Mike Hammer TV series should be too.
Features Syndicate from 1953 to 1954, written by Spillane, Ed Robbins and Joe Gill, with art by Ed Robbins, $49.99

Now it’s your turn. What books that came out this week do you recommend? Take a look at the sidebar to see this weeks collected edition releases.

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